Art

You Should Title That Song “Equestrian”

Omni via Facebook

I’m always intrigued when a band decided to title a track “Equestrian.”

It’s a rare glimpse into how the artistic mind thinks about the sport of horseback riding. And while I’m not always pleased by the portrayal, those equestrian tracks that strike a chord with me are truly wonderful.

Case in point: a few years ago I stumbled upon the recently disbanded U.S. Royalty’s equestrian track. The band vaguely describes this song as a Washington Irving-inspired tune, and I’m desperate to find reference to the Headless Horseman in the song! A steady diet of Cormac McCarthy (author of All The Pretty Horses) and spaghetti westerns also inspired the album.

The result is a most romantic take on what it means to be a free-spirited equestrian. Imagine a bareback mustang and a moonlit ride in the mountains. Now you are getting the vibe of “Equestrian.”

Just this month, another equestrian tune graced the world. This one is by the post-punk Atlanta trio Omni, and it couldn’t be more different from the previous U.S. Royalty track. Nevertheless, Omni has equally nailed what it means for some to be an equestrian.

Lyrically, this equestrian appears to be about a mundane hotel stay, but it’s the tune’s revelry in conspicuous consumption that really makes a point. “You know you’re worth it / You can’t afford it” croons lead singer and bassist Philip Frobos. I think most equestrians with a healthy sense of humor will take his point.

Check out the full track here, and bonus points if the intro chords remind you of the Bruce Springsteen song often co-opted by equestrians, “Born to Run”!

Omni’s new album Multi-Task comes out September 22.


About the Author

Marjorie Wilkinson is the co-founder and co-editor of Counter-Canter Culture—a revolutionary online publication intended to unite the equestrians and equestrian-enthusiasts who aren’t afraid to kick up the dust that has settled on the conventional equine lifestyle. She is also a real-life Hollywood music supervisor and the official curator of Counter-Canter Culture’s musical column, “100% Sound”.