Eventing

Jung Again!

German teams up with fischerRocana for historic 3rd straight Rolex Kentucky championship

Jung ©John Wilkinson/Horse Network

In the 39-year history of the Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event, presented by Land Rover, only three riders have ever managed to win two years in a row. But Michael Jung made history by winning the 2017 Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event for a third consecutive time aboard FischerRocana FST. The German duo lowered one rail in show jumping to finish on 42.7 penalties, just ahead of France’s Maxime Livio and Qalao Des Mers in second (44.6) and England’s Zara Tindall and High Kingdom in third (46.6).

“Without the horse you are just walking people, I’m not sure how you say that in English,” said Jung with a laugh. “This is a very wonderful horse, she is absolutely a top horse, and she is always fighting for me. We have a partnership, I know everything that she needs for me to motivate her. But she was perfect. I am so thankful for my whole team and my horse.”

Jung ©John Wilkinson/Horse Network
Jung©John Wilkinson/Horse Network

By placing fourth, a pair of U.S. veterans, Phillip Dutton and Mr. Medicott (54.6), who took home the Roger Haller Memorial Trophy for the Rolex/USEF CCI4* Eventing National Championship. Dutton won the national championship for a record fifth time, and his finish this weekend on three horses gives him an astounding 40 completions at the Rolex Kentucky.

Dutton ©John Wilkinson/Horse Network

Livio, 29, Saumur, France, had been chasing Jung all weekend, and he is the only person to have beaten him in recent memory, but he settled for second place today. His powerful double-clean round put the pressure on Jung as he cantered out of the ring.

“There is always a little pressure in the ring, especially at a four-star with all the top riders,” Livio said. “With my horse, I just have to stick to him and stick to my ride, and if I do that the pressure goes down. I know if I’m very focused on my riding, the horse will do his best. But, of course there is pressure because I want to be good enough for my horse, and after that it’s good for me to start to put pressure on (Jung). I think to try beat such a rider you have to be 100 percent all the time. All this week my horse was 100 percent, but I was maybe only 90 percent in dressage. But after that I have no regrets.”

Livio. ©John Wilkinson/Horse Network

Tindall, 35, Gloucestershire, England, came in to this event keeping her expectations in check following a difficult trip to the Kentucky Horse Park two years ago where an injury in the stable prevented her from even starting. But each day she put in a sparkling performances to, like Livio, be one of only two to finish on their dressage score.

“I’m obviously very lucky to come back and very thankful to my owner and to Land Rover and Rolex to be able to come back,” she said. “It’s great to be sitting up here with these guys. My horse was fantastic all the way through the competition -he jumped great today.

Tindall ©John Wilkinson/Horse Network

“He doesn’t owe me anything,” added Tindall, noting the horse has been in the ribbons at several four stars and has an Olympic medal and a World Championship medal on his resume. “I loved riding him all weekend. This is such a fantastic competition, thanks for having it.”

Dutton came to Kentucky without his usual enthusiasm. In the fall of 2016, his step-daughter LeeLee Jones suffered a devastating head injury while riding, and has been in the hospital or a rehabilitation facility ever since. “It’s not easy,” he said, emotion coloring his voice. “LeeLee is in rehab at Bryn Mawr and I’m very glad for the livestreaming because she apparently loved watching. But it’s a struggle and it’s something I hope you all don’t ever have to go through. Everybody in the horse world has been great–it’s a great family to be a part of.”

Dutton, 53, West Grove, Pa., brought three horses to Kentucky, and all three finished in the top 10, with Fernhill Fugitive finishing eighth (63.0) and I’m Sew Ready finishing 10th (69.1). But it was his top placing mount, Mr. Medicott, who brought Dutton his fifth national championship.

“Cave,” as he is known, is 18 this year, well past the age that many horses are competing at this level, but he has Olympic performances to his name and was bought for Dutton with those goals in mind. Unfortunately, he suffered an injury and has spent the last two years recovering, but after showing Dutton he was ready, he earned a trip to Rolex Kentucky.

“I was quite unsure about whether I should bring him,” Dutton admitted. “He’s been off for two years, but there wasn’t much else for him the rest of the year that was suitable, and for a horse like this, this is an appropriate event. But for him to show so much heart-I mean, I only did one horse trial on him in two years. He’s such as an incredible horse. I probably didn’t have him fit enough, but he was just incredible this weekend.”

While the horse looked wonderful all weekend, Dutton announced that he would be retiring Mr. Medicott from this level of competition.

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